Purchase Trainings & Tools 

Fostering Relationships aims to support caregivers, staff, and volunteers working with foster youth.

 

Why Online Trainings?

Designed to help you understand the effects of trauma and respond in ways that promote growth and healthy relationships, this online training is organized into four sections, each focusing on one aspect of development: physical, cognitive, social, and emotional.

  • You will find a quiz at the close of each section.
  • At the end of each training you will find:

•  a form for evaluating the training,
•  a form for submitting a question to our panel of experts, and
•  a downloadable “Certificate of Completion.”

 

Why Decks of Conversation Cards? 

The cards are intended for beginning and containing important conversations with and among young people. These unique and innovative Conversation Decks are designed to support those working with traumatized and other vulnerable children, youth, and young adults. Each of the sixteen card decks focuses on an issue or approach that is important to the process of building and sustaining the relationships that are crucial to healthy development and living successfully.

 

About Me

About Me

Through sixteen cards, this innovative Deck of Conversation Cards invites young adolescents to consider different aspects of self and to reflect on how they see themselves in the world around them. These cards can be used in a wide range of settings with any young people interested in self-exploration. The middle school years usher in the beginning of serious attention to the question of “Who am I?” 

Relationship-Based Practices I

Relationship-Based Practices I

For use by individuals or in groups, this sixteen-card deck prompts a thoughtful review of the application of the eight elements of Relationship-Based Practices. It is intended to help staff and volunteers review and implement practices that build and support healthy relationships. Making time and space for reflection is crucial for successful and sustained work with traumatized populations, yet doing so often gets lost in the pressures of daily demands. 

Relationship-Based Practices II

Relationship-Based Practices II

This deck is a resource for individual or group evaluation of relationships. This Deck of Conversation Cards extends the review of the eight elements of Relationship-Based Practices, with two cards devoted to each element. It offers a reminder that the relationship that caseworkers, staff, teachers, caregivers, and volunteers offer vulnerable children, teens, and young adults are the most important part of the work. 

Separations

Separations

The Deck of Conversation Cards gives young people facing these kinds of unclear separations and losses a way of thinking and talking about them. The cards can be used with individuals or in groups. Some losses are final, but many are not. Separations because of divorce, foster care, war, incarceration, immigration, or illness, for example, are often surrounded by uncertainty. This makes it hard for the people left behind to know whether they should be mourning the loss or preparing for a reunion. 

Self Care

Self Care

This deck of sixteen cards is intended to help those who care for others avoid the pattern of always putting others first. Unlike other self-care materials, this innovative deck focuses on the particular issues involved in caring for oneself when working with populations whose lives are characterized by loss, uncertainty, and instability. Too often, staff, caregivers, and volunteers working with vulnerable populations forget that they cannot care for others well unless they first care for themselves.

Online Training - School Age Children: Addressing the Impact of Trauma

Online Training - School Age Children: Addressing the Impact of Trauma

This is an industrious period for children, as they work to learn and learn to work. Mastery of increasingly complex skills builds their confidence and their self-esteem. Traumatized children usually find little pleasure in school because both learning and navigating relationships with peers and adults too often leave them feeling defeated, rather than proud.